Outside Coweta - Wargo's Pumpkin Patch - Luthersville

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

It’s officially fall, and probably our favorite time of year!

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Halloween, cool weather, crunchy leaves and pumpkin flavored everything. It’s all right up our alley!

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

We also love a good pumpkin patch.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo’s Pumpkin patch is a new place to go for free fall family fun.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Corey and Monica Wargofcak live on the family farm that has been passed down through generations.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

They always wanted a fun place to take their kids in the fall to celebrate the autumn season.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

As a service to the community, they decided to open their property to visitors each October.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

The endeavor begins as a family affair way before the air gets that telltale crisp.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

In early June, the family sows a variety of pumpkin seeds in their fields.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

They pumpkins are tended until early October when they are harvested.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

This is a labor-intensive process as it is all done by hand.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

In addition to a large variety of pumpkins, Wargo’s offers a range of delicious fair food and fun activities for the kids like painting, a small petting zoo and hayrides.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

The animals in the petting zoo are the family’s goats and chickens. Monica laughs as she describes to us how friendly the chickens are. Apparently, they get lots of love from the Wargofcak kids and they eat up the attention.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

For those who can’t get enough of local markets, there will also be handmade items for sale from local artisans and crafters.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

We were excited to see Adam’s Honey had a booth. This is an award winning local honey brand we had never heard of, but are excited to try out.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo’s is open every weekend of October and admission, parking, hayrides, painting and the petting zoo are all completely free.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

The pumpkins are all for sale, but the Wargofcak's choose a different charity each year and donate the proceeds.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

We love the Wargo’s Pumpkin Patch t-shirts that feature the original artwork seen on the signs. These will be for sale alongside the arts and crafts.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Luthersville is a short drive from Newnan and the Wargo’s signs are everywhere showing the way to the farm.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

For more details, check out the Wargo’s Facebook page.

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Wargo's Pumpkin Patch Luthersville, GA © Susan Crutchfield Photography

Happy fall! If you make it to Wargo’s, we would love to see your photos and hear about your experience!

Meat N Greet - Newnan

There is one restaurant in Newnan that we find ourselves consistently drawn to.

We are frequent diners at Meat N Greet in downtown Newnan.

Ever since they opened their doors to the public a little over a year ago, Meat N Greet has been a staple for Cowetans looking for a relaxed environment and amazing casual American cuisine.

The interior of the restaurant is decorated a trendy blend of reclaimed barn wood, natural stone and upcycled light fixtures.

Located right across from Full Circle Toys on the square, Meat N Greet serves up craft beers and boutique burgers.

We visited on a fine spring day and chose to sit on their newly opened patio. The weather was perfect with sun’s rays softened by a light breeze.

We decided to celebrate the perfect weather by enjoying a honeysuckle martini. Neither of us are huge drinkers, but for those who like to indulge, the adult beverage menu includes an extensive selection of microbrews, wines and specialty cocktails. The Moscow mule, a Meat N Greet favorite, is delicious.

This cocktail turned out to be an amazing choice for a patio lunch. It was a refreshing vodka martini with flowery citrus notes.

 

We grabbed some onion tangles for an appetizer. Having dined here often, we knew we were getting into some sinfully fried territory. The havoc eating a massive plate of fried onions wreaks on your stomach later is worth the crispy, breaded treat that is a pile of onion tangles.

The Meet N Greet menu includes a selection of unique appetizers, hot dogs and burgers. There are vegetarian options for both burgers and dogs. We got a burger with fries and a hot dog with veggies on the side.

The one eyed willie is indescribably delicious. A juicy burger is piled with lettuce, onions, bacon and cheddar cheese. The whole burger is topped with a fried egg and finished off with smoky tomato jam. Meet N Greet fries are made from scratch in house and you can taste it. They are perfectly seasoned with a hearty potato flavor and just a slight sweetness.

The textbook dog comes with all the traditional hot dog toppings including ketchup, mustard and relish. Since Rebekah is a vegetarian, she ordered the meat free dog. It honestly tastes pretty similar to a pork dog and was absolutely spot on with the textbook toppings.

Meet N Greet offers in season vegetables as a side option. They just happen to be Brussels sprouts at the moment, which despite the universal negative reviews from children forced to eat their veggies, happens to be one of our favorites. They did not disappoint. They were caramelized in a sweet bourbon vinegar based glaze and sprinkled with pecans and a peppery seasoning.

Of course we had to try dessert. We don’t normally get dessert, but it was a treat yourself kind of day, so we went for it.

The bourbon pecan bar came with a scoop of cold, sweet vanilla bean ice cream. It was a little slice of brown sugary, buttery heaven. It is definitely a quintessentially southern dessert.

We also tried the moonpie bread pudding. We were a little hesitant about this one, but the server highly recommended it so we decided to give it a shot. We are very glad we did. It was amazing. It was served in a cute little jelly jar. The dessert was rich and buttery with an almost cake like consistency.

By the time lunch was over, we were so full we practically had to roll ourselves out of the restaurant. Meet N Greet is open seven days a week from eleven to eleven. You can follow their Facebook page to get updates on specialty menu items and beverages.

Historical Highlight - Daniel Newnan

A lot of our blog about Coweta County is focused on Newnan. This is because Newnan is not only the seat of Coweta County, but it is also the largest town in Coweta. This has been the case since 1828 when Newnan acquired its name and status as the county seat. Up until this year, the town that is now Newnan was located around where Starbucks and Southtowne Motors are now and was called Bullsboro. When the town was moved to where the square is now located, it took on the name of the recently retired Secretary of State of Georgia, General Daniel Newnan.


So, who was Daniel Newnan? Newnan was first and foremost a dedicated soldier. He was also a committed politician, a husband and father and a plantation owner. Newnan was born in Salisbury, North Carolina three years before the end of the Revolutionary War. His father was a physician who married the daughter of a very wealthy man. Together, they had eight children.


In 1796, when he was 16, Newnan began his studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was there for only two years before getting into trouble that brought great disapproval from his parents. A friend of the family who was a notable North Carolina politician at the time believed that military service would straighten out the young Newnan. John Steele secured a junior commission with the US Army and by March of 1799, Newnan was a second lieutenant in the Fourth United States Infantry.


Military life did not seem to suit the teenage Newnan. He barely lasted three years before suddenly turning in his resignation in January of 1802. The now twenty two year old Newnan picked up his life and moved near Milledgeville, Georgia where he bought a plantation. He began to grow crops using slave labor.


Soon after moving to Georgia, Newnan became deeply involved in the state militia. Four years after relocating to Georgia, he was appointed adjutant general of Georgia, a highly respected and coveted position. At this point in time, the Georgia Militia were very concerned about Florida. The state was a colony of Spain and the United States desperately wanted to annex it. Additionally, Newnan and other plantation owners in the militia were concerned that Native Americans living in Florida were harboring escaped slaves.


In the hottest months of 1812, Newnan added to his reputation of military prowess when he led a small unit of Georgia volunteers down to Florida to attack the Native Americans that dared to welcome slaves into their numbers. They planned to decimate entire villages by killing the inhabitants and burning them to the ground. The plan failed miserably when the militia turned out to be unprepared to meet the Seminoles on their own turf. They were badly beaten and had to beat a hasty retreat with many sick men and no food. Newnan detailed the incident in a letter to his commander, which highlighted his skills, greatly exaggerated the number of Seminole deaths and blamed other officers for some of the problems. This Florida encounter greatly added to his military reputation.


In 1814, Newnan was in a skirmish with the Creek Indians in Alabama where he was seriously wounded by three shots. This effectively ended his military combat career and politics became his main focus. At this time, Newnan had moved his plantation from Milledgeville to Putnam County. Census records show him being married with five children. In 1817, he gave up his position of adjutant general and was made major general over the Third Division of the Georgia Militia.


Newnan’s political career began to escalate in 1820 when he was elected to the lower house of the legislature where he lent his military and agricultural expertise to internal committees. After a long military career, he was appointed as superintendent of the Georgia State Penitentiary at the age of forty-three. From this position, he rose to become Secretary of State of Georgia on November 15, 1825. He served in this capacity for two years.


Newnan moved once again to a new plantation in Henry County. Here, he achieved the height of his political career with an election to the twenty-second congress. He spent two years in Washington heading committees and fighting for the causes that meant the most to him. When he failed to win a congressional reelection, he resumed his position as adjutant general in Georgia. In 1835, at the age of fifty-five, Newnan tried to reenlist in the military and was kindly but firmly refused. In 1837, he became brigadier general of Georgia.


After his retirement, he moved outside of Rossville, Georgia on the Tennessee border to a community later named Newnan Springs. This is where Newnan spent his last days until he quietly passed away at the age of seventy-one. He is buried at Newnan Springs Cemetery in Catoosa County, Georgia. In 1927, the city of Newnan donated money to erect a bronze plaque to mark his gravesite and outline his accomplishments as a soldier and politician.


In addition to his final home in Newnan Springs and the city of Newnan in Coweta County, Daniel Newnan has a fort and a lake named after him.